Unruly Places: Lost Spaces, Secret Cities, and Other

Unruly Places: Lost Spaces, Secret Cities, and Other Inscrutable Geographies A tour of the world s hidden geographies from disappearing islands to forbidden deserts and a stunning testament to how mysterious the world remains todayAt a time when Google Maps Street View can take you on a virtual tour of Yosemite s remotest trails and cell phones double as navigational systems, it s hard to imagine there s any uncharted ground left on the planet In Unruly Places, Alastair Bonnett goes to some of the most unexpected, offbeat places in the world to reinspire our geographical imaginationBonnett s remarkable tour includes moving villages, secret cities, no man s lands, and floating islands He explores places as disorienting as Sandy Island, an island included on maps until just two years ago despite the fact that it never existed Or Sealand, an abandoned gun platform off the English coast that a British citizen claimed as his own sovereign nation, issuing passports and crowning his wife as a princess Or Baarle, a patchwork of Dutch and Flemish enclaves where walking from the grocery store s produce section to the meat counter can involve crossing national bordersAn intrepid guide down the road much less traveled, Bonnett reveals that the most extraordinary places on earth might be hidden in plain sight, just around the corner from your apartment or underfoot on a wooded path Perfect for urban explorers, wilderness ramblers, and armchair travelers struck by wanderlust, Unruly Places will change the way you see the places you inhabit ➹ [Read] ➵ Gender in Psychoanalytic Space By Muriel Dimen ➼ – 9facts.co.uk it s hard to imagine there s any uncharted ground left on the planet In Unruly Places ❮Download❯ ➵ Insight and Interpretation Author Roy Schafer – 9facts.co.uk Alastair Bonnett goes to some of the most unexpected ➼ [Reading] ➾ Good People in an Evil Time By Svetlana Broz ➱ – 9facts.co.uk offbeat places in the world to reinspire our geographical imaginationBonnett s remarkable tour includes moving villages ❰Reading❯ ➼ On a Day Like This Author Peter Stamm – 9facts.co.uk secret cities [PDF] ✎ Heart to Start ✐ Derek Handley – 9facts.co.uk no man s lands ✅ [PDF / Epub] ☉ Light without Fire By Scott Korb ⚣ – 9facts.co.uk and floating islands He explores places as disorienting as Sandy Island ❰EPUB❯ ✺ Secrecy Author Rupert Thomson – 9facts.co.uk an island included on maps until just two years ago despite the fact that it never existed Or Sealand [PDF / Epub] ✅ The Silence and the Roar By Nihad Sirees – 9facts.co.uk an abandoned gun platform off the English coast that a British citizen claimed as his own sovereign nation ☀ [PDF / Epub] ★ Hard Country By Robin Robilliard ✍ – 9facts.co.uk issuing passports and crowning his wife as a princess Or Baarle [PDF / Epub] ✑ The Whale Rider ☄ Witi Ihimaera – 9facts.co.uk a patchwork of Dutch and Flemish enclaves where walking from the grocery store s produce section to the meat counter can involve crossing national bordersAn intrepid guide down the road much less traveled [KINDLE] ✽ The Impossible David Lynch By Todd McGowan – 9facts.co.uk Bonnett reveals that the most extraordinary places on earth might be hidden in plain sight ❰Ebook❯ ➣ The Colour Encyclopedia Of Incredible Aeroplanes Author Philip J. Jarrett – 9facts.co.uk just around the corner from your apartment or underfoot on a wooded path Perfect for urban explorers ❮PDF / Epub❯ ☆ Tooth Sleuth, Mystery of the Missing Tooth (Shirley Lock Mysteries Author Mia Woolfe – 9facts.co.uk wilderness ramblers ☆ Juno Of Taris PDF / Epub ✩ Author Fleur Beale – 9facts.co.uk and armchair travelers struck by wanderlust [Reading] ➸ The Faithful Scribe ➮ Shahan Mufti – 9facts.co.uk Unruly Places will change the way you see the places you inhabit


10 thoughts on “Unruly Places: Lost Spaces, Secret Cities, and Other Inscrutable Geographies

  1. B Schrodinger B Schrodinger says:

    Books about maps and weird geography always get me I m a sucker for them.Alastair Bonnett offers up Off the Map to us geo nerds and it s premise is to talk about many weird places that have their weirdness due to several reasons He breaks the reasons down into several categories or chapters dead places, in between places, places that never were and renegade places You ll read about an island that was on maps into the early 2000s, even on google maps, that never existed, a town that grew up Books about maps and weird geography always get me I m a sucker for them.Alastair Bonnett offers up Off the Map to us geo nerds and it s premise is to talk about many weird places that have their weirdness due to several reasons He breaks the reasons down into several categories or chapters dead places, in between places, places that never were and renegade places You ll read about an island that was on maps into the early 2000s, even on google maps, that never existed, a town that grew up in a cemetery, Sealand, the small nation established on a WWII gunner platform off the UK coast, islands made of trash or pumice, The World a sailing ship for the ultra wealthy and many others.While there were lots of fascinating tales as well as obscure facts in this book it did not quite fulfil my desire The author is quite eloquent and his observations and conclusions are astute But there was not much in between This book swayed from trivia to philosophical observation in a heartbeat and then the chapter ended and you were thrown into another weirdness With just over seventy different places to chapters in a 300 page book, you were left on an ride of going oh that s fascinating , that s a great observation to oh that s the end of that Maybe I can look up all those extra questions I have on Google When a book does this seventy times it s a little frustrating It s evenastounding that the author seemed to have travelled to some of these places and interviewed people, all for 5 or six pages of text It seems like an awful waste I would have loved to see ten or twelve of these places properly discussed instead of a frenetic whirlwind So, definitely one for completists and lovers of geography, especially those who love trivia


  2. jeremy jeremy says:

    authentic topophilia can never be satisfied with a diet of sunny villages the most fascinating places are often also the most disturbing, entrapping, and appalling they are also often temporary in ten years time most of the places we will be exploring will look very different many will not be there at all but just as biophilia doesn t lessen because we know that nature is often horrible and that all life is transitory, genuine topophilia knows that our bond with place isn t about findin authentic topophilia can never be satisfied with a diet of sunny villages the most fascinating places are often also the most disturbing, entrapping, and appalling they are also often temporary in ten years time most of the places we will be exploring will look very different many will not be there at all but just as biophilia doesn t lessen because we know that nature is often horrible and that all life is transitory, genuine topophilia knows that our bond with place isn t about finding the geographical equivalent of kittens and puppies this is a fierce love it is a dark enchantment it goes deep and demands our attentionalastair bonnett s unruly places offers transportive and captivating glimpses into the world s lost spaces, secret cities, and other inscrutable geographies divided into eight sections lost spaces, hidden geographies, no man s lands, dead cities, spaces of exception, enclaves and breakaway nations, floating islands, and ephemeral places, bonnett s compendium of geographical curiosities will allure wanderlusters and imaginarians alike bonnett takes us around the globe, visiting forty seven locales of remarkable disparity an island long believed to exist that actually doesn t , a once great sea that s now nearly desert, turkish underground cities, a cemetery inhabited by the living, traffic islands, lands of shifting borders, cities abandoned after industrial disasters, cities left unfinished, freeports, secret prisons, intentional communities, illegal settlements, feral cities, a land forbidden to women including female animals , pumice rafts, trash islands, man made islands, floating communities, public sex spots, play spaces, and an airport parking lot, amongst many others.bonnett, a professor of social geography, invites us to think about the nature and meaning of place, drawing our attention to the neglected, forgotten, unknown, and undesirable locations that dot our planet we are led to consider what specifically it might be that makes place so important to our species collectively and as individuals while bonnett s vignettes are wonderfully intriguing and succinctly portrayed, unruly places shies away from the deeper philosophical explorations it could have so easily embarked upon it is, nonetheless, an engrossing tour of some of the world s most enigmatic and curious locales yet while those who care about place have a lot to be troubled about, it would be a shame if this discussion was limited to nostalgic laments as we have seen, the world is still full of unexpected places that have the power to delight, sometimes appall, but always intrigue these unruly places provoke us and force us to think about the neglected but fundamental role of place in our lives they challenge us to see ourselves for what we are a place making and place loving species.


  3. Jenny (Reading Envy) Jenny (Reading Envy) says:

    I really enjoyed this book, and it will go right next to Atlas of Remote Islands on my geeky geography wishlist.The author uncovers some obscure instances of secret lost unknown places, like floating pumice islands, towns not listed on maps in Russia, underground cities, and disappearing corners.What about the music festival that happens in an ice cave in Norway Sign me up I really enjoyed this book, and it will go right next to Atlas of Remote Islands on my geeky geography wishlist.The author uncovers some obscure instances of secret lost unknown places, like floating pumice islands, towns not listed on maps in Russia, underground cities, and disappearing corners.What about the music festival that happens in an ice cave in Norway Sign me up


  4. Paul Paul says:

    Apart from some obscure bits of therainforest and Indonesian jungles we think that there can be no undiscovered parts of the world can there Surely, we must have discovered everything on Google Earth by now Off The Map sets about putting that record straight In this book, Bonnett helps us discover secret places, unexpected islands, slivers of a metropolis and hidden villages Russia seems to havethan its fair share of secret and abandoned cities There is Zheleznogorsk, a milit Apart from some obscure bits of therainforest and Indonesian jungles we think that there can be no undiscovered parts of the world can there Surely, we must have discovered everything on Google Earth by now Off The Map sets about putting that record straight In this book, Bonnett helps us discover secret places, unexpected islands, slivers of a metropolis and hidden villages Russia seems to havethan its fair share of secret and abandoned cities There is Zheleznogorsk, a military town that never existed on any map and still retains some of its secrecy today Probably the most infamous is Pripyat, abandoned days after the nuclear explosion at Chenobyl, it is slowly being reclaimed by nature the amount of radiation means that the area will not be safe for humans to reoccupy for at least 900 years Give or take Bonnett tells us about disputed borders that mean that the people still living there are unattached to any nation, a man in New York who bought the tiny strips of land alongside tower blocks for a few dollars each There is Sealand, a fortress built in World War Two and now a self declared principality in the North Sea Other islands exist in out oceans too, some that are on maps that have never been there, others made from rubbish that has collected together and occasionally floating rocks or pumice as it is better known, the residue from underwater volcanoes There is also a huge vessel called the World, collectively owned by the residents, it ploughs the seas keeping all the riff raff away He mentions the abandoned villages of England from the second world war, including one just down the road from me Arne.It is a fascinating book, full of weird and wonderful trivia about places that you really wouldn t want to visit on your holidays It is also an exploration of what makes a landscape and the things we draw from it Worth reading for anyone who is fascinated by those places that just don t fit the map 3.5 stars


  5. Nancy Kennedy Nancy Kennedy says:

    In Unruly Places, Alastair Bonnett has written neither a tour guide nor a history book Instead, it s a sort of mash up of history, philosophy and sociology applied to the geography of little known places on the earth In separate chapters, the author examines places as diverse as islands that appear only on maps, underground colonies, deserted cities, male only religious territories, and even urban gutterspace, or slivers of land between buildings.Facts are my thing Theory not so much I f In Unruly Places, Alastair Bonnett has written neither a tour guide nor a history book Instead, it s a sort of mash up of history, philosophy and sociology applied to the geography of little known places on the earth In separate chapters, the author examines places as diverse as islands that appear only on maps, underground colonies, deserted cities, male only religious territories, and even urban gutterspace, or slivers of land between buildings.Facts are my thing Theory not so much I found some parts of the book interesting and some of it too conceptual to capture my interest I knew a little bit about some of the places the author examines for example, underground cities inhabited by early Christians and I enjoyed learningabout them But the author s philosophizing often made no sense to me Of living underground, he says on one page that there is something down there something we are drawn to, but just a few pages later says only the truly fearful choose to live under the ground Which is it Are we drawn to it Or forced underground The chapters are brief, some only three or four pages, so you can take this book a little at a time, if you like It s probably better to read it that way, as the connecting tissue of the book is fairly thin But if you like to examine the mundane in a poetic way, this might be the book for you For example, here is how the author starts his chapter on Enclaves and Breakaway Nations I don t have an easy relationship with borders They frighten and unnerve me Searched, prodded, delayed again and again, for the temerity of crossing a few feet of land They are bureaucratic fault lines, imperious and unfriendly Not really my thoughts as I cross a border, but then again, I m not a poet or philosopher


  6. Althea Ann Althea Ann says:

    This is a great book to pick up when you don t have the time or attention span to sit down and get engrossed in something lengthy It feels almost like a compilation of a column from a magazine a couple of pages devoted to each entry.The theme is interesting places around the world The focus is on the interstitial things that are caught in the margins, between one thing and the other, not one thing or the other, overlooked, decaying, forgotten Like many others, I find such things fascina This is a great book to pick up when you don t have the time or attention span to sit down and get engrossed in something lengthy It feels almost like a compilation of a column from a magazine a couple of pages devoted to each entry.The theme is interesting places around the world The focus is on the interstitial things that are caught in the margins, between one thing and the other, not one thing or the other, overlooked, decaying, forgotten Like many others, I find such things fascinating, so I picked up this book both as a potential guidebook and to hear the author s take on such places.At a few junctures, the authors pontificating can get slightly pompous, in the manner of an academic lecture Overall, however, his ideas about the psychology of topography our conception of space, place, and borders and how those change over time, are affected by politics, etc , are quite fascinating The chosen places, and the factual information on each of them, was also interesting I did know about a decent percentage of the places mentioned, but I still kept raising my head up from the book to say to whoever was around Hey Did you know Each item that the author has included an essay on is accompanied by its longitude and latitude however, what would ve really brought this book up to 5 stars is if the author had teamed up with a National Geographic quality photographer in order to illustrate these locations For nearly every item, I found myself longing to see it as described not just to peer at it via Google Earth A coffee table edition, with photos, would be a great project An advance copy of this book was provided by NetGalley Thanks so much for the opportunity to read As always, my opinions are my own


  7. Emma Sea Emma Sea says:

    I wanted to like this book a hell of a lotthan I did I found it all a little tooordinary The places or non places were well described, but the words lacked that magic sense of evocativeness, and the what they tell us about the world justmissed, somehow Maybe it s because it s formatted as a series of almost encyclopedic entries, each about one specific place There s no overall thematic structure or narrative to tie them together Or maybe it s because these aren t, in I wanted to like this book a hell of a lotthan I did I found it all a little tooordinary The places or non places were well described, but the words lacked that magic sense of evocativeness, and the what they tell us about the world justmissed, somehow Maybe it s because it s formatted as a series of almost encyclopedic entries, each about one specific place There s no overall thematic structure or narrative to tie them together Or maybe it s because these aren t, in general, places that Bonnett has a link to, that he s visited He s pulled the information for entries from other books, because they re interesting on the surface There s little personal connection to Bonnett in here, outside of a few succinctly stated anecdotes But place is mediated through human experience, and without that spark of connectedness everything was just a little hollow and flat.This is nothing like a gorgeous as any of Mary Oliver s writing about place, or Robert MacFarlane s.I feel guilty for giving it a 2, but for me it was only OK


  8. Thomas Cook Thomas Cook says:

    I was disappointed in this book I wanted to like it, and perhaps I am too much of a geographic stickler, but the read did not live up to the premise of the title The author did not travel to many of the places listed, and there are too many places listed Nor does the collection hang together The book works well as a sampling of interesting places, and you can open it up anywhere and have a fun read leave it in the restroom.


  9. Laura Laura says:

    As stated in the publisher marketing this is not a book you need to read cover to cover and I have not though I would like to go back at some point and do so because it is clear the author has a particular flow to these essays in mind Instead, I have been like a chicken pecking here and there in the grass when just steps away is a feeding trough neatly laid out Ad though the reader can amass a wonderful collection of conversational trivia from this marvelous essay collection, it is farAs stated in the publisher marketing this is not a book you need to read cover to cover and I have not though I would like to go back at some point and do so because it is clear the author has a particular flow to these essays in mind Instead, I have been like a chicken pecking here and there in the grass when just steps away is a feeding trough neatly laid out Ad though the reader can amass a wonderful collection of conversational trivia from this marvelous essay collection, it is farthan cocktail party fodder It is a collection with intellect and scope, a geo social treatise on place and landscape, on belonging and on the mystery of our ever changing planet Bonnett examines the relationship between place and the human psyche and give intriguing examples of both natural and unnatural geological change More than mere geographical observation and stopping short of environmental activism, the author seeks to engage our geological imagination Bonnett strings together stories of earth s transitional landscapes, the paradox of border regions and no man s lands, the rapid appearance and disappearance of islands, inland seas, and communities Fascinating and impressively presented


  10. Daren Daren says:

    Well, it took me longer to shelve the countries than it will to reviewThis was a great drop in drop out book the way I used it was for a half hour here and a half hour there There are forty seven short stories in this book, divided into eight themes sections They average about six pages each, so very manageable.Of the forty seven stories, there were probably 10 great stories, another fifteen good ones, and at the other end, probably 10 that were terrible That leaves a dozen that were rea Well, it took me longer to shelve the countries than it will to reviewThis was a great drop in drop out book the way I used it was for a half hour here and a half hour there There are forty seven short stories in this book, divided into eight themes sections They average about six pages each, so very manageable.Of the forty seven stories, there were probably 10 great stories, another fifteen good ones, and at the other end, probably 10 that were terrible That leaves a dozen that were readable without being muchOn that basis it ishit than miss, and tracks around three stars for me.My expectations going in were quirks in geography, hidden corners, border anomalies and probably some off the grid type military or political enclaves These were present, and probably formed theenjoyable part of my reading, along with a few other unusual chapters The chapters that didn t really resonate with me were theephemeral or theoretical ones where geography and history slip into sociology and psychology This is of course purely personal preference, but that s the way it fell to me I think fewer locations, better selected and in a littledepth would have suited me.Particular highlights, off the top of my head the underground cities of Cappadocia, North Sentinal Island, the land border section India Bangladesh Sudan Egypt El Salvador Honduras and some of the floating islands and enclaves.Worth a read, but probably I would struggle to sit down and read it cover to cover


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